?

Log in

No account? Create an account
 
 
09 March 2004 @ 09:23 pm
Trust revisited  
For me trust is an earned commodity, and it is earned in increments. There are degrees of trust.

Someone burned by one in whom they have trusted will, of course, grant those incremental "trust points" with less generosity than one who has never been in a position of having their trust misplaced.

-Sandra


*nod*

Trust is the single most valuable commodity I possess, and is not bestowed lightly. There exists no 'right' to my trust, it is a gift that I may share with others. It is something to be earned, rather than expected.

Unfortunately there are many people in the world who treat 'trust' as commonplace, who take it for granted, or dismiss it's value out of hand *sigh* That sort of behavior is what leads to the less generosity that Sandra mentioned.

'Give people your trust until they break it' Why? Turning the equation around is equally valid. Perhaps more so, really.

Trust also has to do with protection. In the end I am the one who has to protect myself 'cause no one else is going to do it.

-the redhead-
...who knows that pretty words are nothing more than that...
Tags:
 
 
 
Musings from the CZ unitcz_unit on March 10th, 2004 04:43 am (UTC)
'Give people your trust until they break it' Why? Turning the equation around is equally valid. Perhaps more so, really.

Depends on the community and the rate of interaction. If this is a community where trust is commonplace (say a mature bunch of people) then extending trust first is a reasonable idea. You're moderately assured of being returned in kind. If this is a community of immature dolts, then the reverse is probably better.

Interaction: If you are never going to interact with the person again, then the best way to play the game is to defect (not trust). You know this, they know this. If however you are going to interact with this person again in the future, then playing by the standard rules (trust first and give them a chance, then reflect) is the strategy that will work best in the long term.

CZ
-the redhead-theredhead on March 12th, 2004 11:41 am (UTC)
There's a big different between not trusting and defecting. Not trusting is merely the witholding of something, whereas defetice is akin to actively opposing something.

trust first and give them a chance, then reflect This is social trust, which is more politeness than trus (see below in comments)

-the redhead-